Collection: Hope Technology Mountain Bike Components

Since the first few days of trade back in 1989, Hope Technology co-owners Ian Weatherill and Simon Sharp have maintained the same ethos behind the business – high quality products, no sales waffle.Let the products do the talking. For nearly 25 years, Hope Technology has been pushing the industry forward through designing, testing and manufacturing virtually all products in-house at the factory in Barnoldswick, United Kingdom.  Here's how it started:

In 1985, Ian Weatherill and Simon Sharp, motorcycle trials friends, left Rolls Royce Aerospace and setup their own tool making company, IPCO making jigs and fixtures for local aerospace companies.

Not happy with their cantilever brakes, in 1989, along with employee Owen Hardisty, they decide to make their own.  The calipers were cable operated and used rear, screw-on hubs on the front of the bike, with the rotor screwed onto them.

In 1990, their company IPCO moves 3 miles from the Nelson factory (1,500 sq ft) to a new factory in Colne, Lancashire (11,000 sq ft), the 'Hope Shed' later changed to 'Hope Mill'.  Then, in 1991, after 2 years of designing and making hubs and brakes for their own and friends use, Hope Technology is formed to make and sell disc brakes and hubs. The mechanical disc brake was the first product sold to the market.

1991 also saw Hope make its first 6 bolt disc specific hubs fitted with quality sealed cartridge bearings. The hubs resembled those used on trials motorcycles, but were not the same 6 bolt pattern we are now familiar with.

Hope went global in 1992 by showcasing their product at Interbike, Anaheim, USA There were brakes on 14 different show bikes around the halls. At this point, Hope only had 14 brakes... Hope’s hubs started selling in big numbers in their native UK where US imported products are expensive. Hope gains a good following for their hubs alone. A satellite office was setup in California to service US sales.

Hope also launched the Ti-glide rear hub, one of the first Shimano compatible, after market hubs. It used a titanium central body and titanium cassette carrier. It was light, strong and looked cool too....

Then - a big investment was made with the purchase of Hope’s first CNC machine. 

Original Hope brakes - there is a yellow fork, rear mtb frame, hubs, and an old cnc machine originally purchased by Hope Technology.

In 1994 and 95, Hope introduces their first hydraulic brake, launched at Eurobike with a concept twin disc system. Production brakes were only available as a single disc. It was a powerful "open" system fitting to CNC’d fork adaptors at the front and custom braze-ons at the rear.

The Big'un hubset is also introduced. The hub had a 5 bolt disc fitting and used the 3 pawl ratchet system. The 185mm front disc is introduced for downhill racing. Hope switch to Kevlar reinforced hydraulic hosing.

In 1997, Ti-bottom brackets were put into production and sold for a mere £90 – bargain at the time! 

The Hope Mono6ti brake is the first bicycle disc brake to feature titanium pistons fitted to a 6 piston, one piece caliper.

Co-owner Ian Weatherill and employee Neil Arnold compete in the BCF downhill championships at Fort William, using Lawwill designed Yeti Straight 4 frames and Zzyzx forks designed by Hanebrink with 6" of travel and RockShocks DHO forks.

Hope’s DH4 downhill brake is unveiled at Interbike, Las Vegas – using an open system. The Pro series lever is also introduced. The caliper gets lightened and slimmed down.

Hope’s now Progress Manager, Woody Hole, competes on the international downhill Grundig World Cup scene, clinching some top 30 results on his GT along the way!

Hope expands again, tripling the size of the factory with the move from Skelton St, Colne to Skipton Road, Barnoldswick (39,000 sq ft).  In 2000, Hope launched the Bulb hubs. This first model had a splined fitting to allow a disc and spider to be fitted. It became the benchmark front hub due to its versatility in allowing either QR or 20mm axles in the same hub. After a year of testing on the 1999 World Cup circuit with the likes of GT's then Steve Peat, the Hope 4 pot downhill brake, the DH4, finally came into production and was offered to the market.

Future National Cyclo-cross Champion Paul Oldham joins Hope, bringing his knowledge as an elite racer to Hope’s research and development testing programme.  In 2001 the legendary Mini brakes launched. Hopes first brake designed with form as well as function playing important parts in the development process. Moving back to an open system for XC use, still with no drag. After his first race on the Minis, elite XC racer Paul Lasenby claimed at the time: "If anyone asks me about V’s or discs now, I can only say that if you don’t have discs then you’re at a disadvantage." Paul clearly knew what he was talking about!  Note:  Monk a Moo, Inc, aka monkamoo.com, was also formed in August of 2001, and shortly thereafter became an authorized dealer of Hope.

2003 - Launch of the Mono6ti brakes, bringing motorcycle multi piston callipers to the cycle world.

The Mono6ti brake is the first bicycle disc brake to feature titanium pistons fitted to a 6 piston, one piece caliper. Mini and M4 brakes changed to Mono callipers – one piece technology offering unrivalled stiffness and enhanced lever feel – technology which is still being used today.

2005-2008 - Stems, lights, bottom brackets, and the infamous vented V2 brakes were introduced. The Hope factory is also moved into bigger premises to Fernbank Mill, Barnoldswick (56,000 sq ft).

Fast forward to 2011-12 - Hope invests in local riders and the community by funding and building the "Hope Line" descent at the local trail centre, Gisburn Forest. With the input of experieced extreme enduro riders, brothers Dan and Ben Hemmingway and the local trail builders, the red graded Hope Line incorporates long drifting berms and flowy table tops.  

"Hope Line" descent at the local trail centre, Gisburn Forest. The red graded Hope Line incorporates long drifting berms and flowy table tops.

Then, following two years of preparations, Hope finally makes the big move into the current factory Hope Mill at Calf Hall Lane in Barnoldswich (89,000 sq ft).

Following two years of preparations, Hope finally makes the big move into the current factory Hope Mill at Calf Hall Lane in Barnoldswich (89,000 sq ft).

2013-Present - Hope Factory Racing continues their domination in cyclo-cross, as the Team take their thrid consecutive win of the Rapha Supercross series.

Hope is paid a visit by the Prime Minister, David Cameron, as part of the "Get Britain Cycling" campaign.

41 products
  • Hope Tech Disc Brake MTB Floating Rotors
    Hope Tech Mountain Bike Two-Piece Floating Rotors - Six Colors
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    $69.99
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  • Hope Tech Pro 4 MTB Front Hub - 15 MM Boost/Standard
    Hope Tech 15mm Standard or Boost Front Hub for  Mountain Bikes - Six Colors
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    $109.99
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    $109.99
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  • Hope Tech Pro 4 MTB Rear Hub - 12x148 MM Boost
    Hope Rear MTB Hun 12x148 MM for Boost - Six Colors
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    $229.99
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  • Hope Tech Pro 4 MTB Front Hub - 20 MM Boost/Standard
    Hope Tech 20mm Standard or Boost Front Hub for  Mountain Bikes - Six Colors
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    $109.99
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  • Hope Tech 3 E4 Full MTB Brakeset: No Rotors/Adapters
    Hope Tech 3 E4 Mountain Bike Disc Brakes - Six Colors
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    $439.99
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    $439.99
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  • Hope Tech 3 E4 MTB Brakeset - Rear
    Hope Tech 3 E4 Mountain Bike Disc Brakes - Six Colors
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  • Hope Tech Threaded Bottom Bracket
    Hope Tech Threaded Bottom Bracket - monkamoo.com
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    $129.99
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  • Hope Tech CNC AM Freeride Stem
    Hope Tech CNC Am Freeride Mountain Bike Stem - Six Colors
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    $129.99
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    $129.99
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